Skip to main content
Name
Architect
Client
Location
ShedKM Architects
Stanhope PLC
London, UK

This prestigious commercial development will see a high-quality new build office constructed on the vacant site at 3 Ruskin Square, Croydon. The development will provide over 36,000 square meters of grade A office space, arranged over 15 floors above ground. The proposed building is square in plan with a uniform floor plate. Between the ground level and the first floor, an internal mezzanine level will unify with an exterior podium level. Rather than being hidden away, the structure is to be expressed as part of the architectural theme.

In conjunction with ShedKM architects, we have developed several structural options with an emphasis on sustainable forms of construction which act to minimise the embodied carbon of the structural frame. These options include a Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) ‘flat slab’ and a hybrid CLT and steel structure which are both demountable. In parallel with these, we have developed more traditional composite steel and concrete options that take advantage of economic bay sizes to realise carbon and cost savings.

Workplace
Architect
ShedKM Architects
Client
Stanhope PLC
Location
London, UK

This prestigious commercial development will see a high-quality new build office constructed on the vacant site at 3 Ruskin Square, Croydon. The development will provide over 36,000 square meters of grade A office space, arranged over 15 floors above ground. The proposed building is square in plan with a uniform floor plate. Between the ground level and the first floor, an internal mezzanine level will unify with an exterior podium level. Rather than being hidden away, the structure is to be expressed as part of the architectural theme.

In conjunction with ShedKM architects, we have developed several structural options with an emphasis on sustainable forms of construction which act to minimise the embodied carbon of the structural frame. These options include a Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) ‘flat slab’ and a hybrid CLT and steel structure which are both demountable. In parallel with these, we have developed more traditional composite steel and concrete options that take advantage of economic bay sizes to realise carbon and cost savings.

Workplace
Architect
ShedKM Architects
Client
Stanhope PLC
Location
London, UK
Morrow + Lorraine Architects
LS Estates
London, UK

Suffering from an uninviting street presence and dark office spaces, our redevelopment of 7 Newgate Street has allowed this early 2000s central London office building to offer a bright, open frontage and façade, a new rooftop pavilion and high-quality office facilities.

The project involved the complete refurbishment and redevelopment of the existing 8-storey building — including a single-storey basement — and the construction of a new glazed roof pavilion with access to a communal, landscaped terrace providing unparalleled views of the local skyline.

‘The Newgate’ was designed to be low-carbon and energy-efficient from the outset, and the results demonstrate the value of retrofit over new build. Our structural and sustainability teams worked together to provide detailed carbon calculations for evaluating structural options. 

The estimated embodied carbon saving in the structure is approximately 5,800 tC02e, compared to the current industry average for commercial new builds.Set between St Paul’s Cathedral and The Old Bailey, the building’s new pavilion and landscaped terraces on the top floor offer unique views of several city landmarks. The new rooftop pavilion's lightweight hybrid timber and steel structure was carefully engineered to reduce the amount of strengthening works required for the structure below, reducing the embodied carbon footprint of the refurbishment.

Workplace
Architect
Morrow + Lorraine Architects
Client
LS Estates
Location
London, UK

Suffering from an uninviting street presence and dark office spaces, our redevelopment of 7 Newgate Street has allowed this early 2000s central London office building to offer a bright, open frontage and façade, a new rooftop pavilion and high-quality office facilities.

The project involved the complete refurbishment and redevelopment of the existing 8-storey building — including a single-storey basement — and the construction of a new glazed roof pavilion with access to a communal, landscaped terrace providing unparalleled views of the local skyline.

‘The Newgate’ was designed to be low-carbon and energy-efficient from the outset, and the results demonstrate the value of retrofit over new build. Our structural and sustainability teams worked together to provide detailed carbon calculations for evaluating structural options. 

The estimated embodied carbon saving in the structure is approximately 5,800 tC02e, compared to the current industry average for commercial new builds.Set between St Paul’s Cathedral and The Old Bailey, the building’s new pavilion and landscaped terraces on the top floor offer unique views of several city landmarks. The new rooftop pavilion's lightweight hybrid timber and steel structure was carefully engineered to reduce the amount of strengthening works required for the structure below, reducing the embodied carbon footprint of the refurbishment.

Workplace
Architect
Morrow + Lorraine Architects
Client
LS Estates
Location
London, UK
Piercy & Company
The Crown Estate
London, UK

We have been appointed by The Crown Estate to carry out the major refurbishment of 10 Piccadilly. The building is situated on Piccadilly Circus and forms part of John Nash’s Regent Street Quadrant.

The proposals will provide an exemplary building in The Crown Estate’s portfolio, with high sustainability credentials bringing the building into the 21st Century.
Much of our work will focus on the roof level to create a roof terrace and F+B offering on the upper floors which will be accessed via a sunken courtyard.

Within the building, new service cores and risers will be added to the centre of the floorplate and historic lightwells will be infilled to create more lettable areas. We are working closely with Piercy & Company to unpick the historic alterations which have been done on an ad-hoc basis by previous tenants. Now that the building as a whole is being refurbished, it has provided an opportunity to rationalise the building’s structure.

Image: The Sting, 1 Piccadilly by John Allan

Workplace
Architect
Piercy & Company
Client
The Crown Estate
Location
London, UK

We have been appointed by The Crown Estate to carry out the major refurbishment of 10 Piccadilly. The building is situated on Piccadilly Circus and forms part of John Nash’s Regent Street Quadrant.

The proposals will provide an exemplary building in The Crown Estate’s portfolio, with high sustainability credentials bringing the building into the 21st Century.
Much of our work will focus on the roof level to create a roof terrace and F+B offering on the upper floors which will be accessed via a sunken courtyard.

Within the building, new service cores and risers will be added to the centre of the floorplate and historic lightwells will be infilled to create more lettable areas. We are working closely with Piercy & Company to unpick the historic alterations which have been done on an ad-hoc basis by previous tenants. Now that the building as a whole is being refurbished, it has provided an opportunity to rationalise the building’s structure.

Image: The Sting, 1 Piccadilly by John Allan

Workplace
Architect
Piercy & Company
Client
The Crown Estate
Location
London, UK
Studio Seilern
BB House UK Ltd
London, UK

Shortlisted for the 2019 BCO Awards and AJ Retrofit Awards, the initial concept for the remodelling of this 1970s building in Kensington was based on a stressed-skin panel design, spanning between primary beams.

The structural solution was developed into a full-width spanning bi-planar arch structure constructed with internally exposed GluLam primary and secondary beams, and CLT panels forming an exterior shell. Arranging the facets in this way meant the roof structure was independently stable, not requiring lateral restraint from the floor below. Due to height restrictions on the proposals, an origami roof solution was developed to maximise the volume of the new top storey. This was to be exposed internally, with integrated roof lights to maximise daylight into the floor plate. A timber shell structure was created to sit on top of the existing building.

The new building was designed to be an ultra-modern, high-spec office space. New services were required and the façade was designed to have integrated risers to limit impact on floor area. The front façade was replaced with a contemporary masonry façade with a steel frame behind to reinstate stability and vertical load transfer. A new atrium was created through the existing floor plates which required a feature stair that also supported the upper floors to allow removal of existing columns.

Workplace
Architect
Studio Seilern
Client
BB House UK Ltd
Location
London, UK

Shortlisted for the 2019 BCO Awards and AJ Retrofit Awards, the initial concept for the remodelling of this 1970s building in Kensington was based on a stressed-skin panel design, spanning between primary beams.

The structural solution was developed into a full-width spanning bi-planar arch structure constructed with internally exposed GluLam primary and secondary beams, and CLT panels forming an exterior shell. Arranging the facets in this way meant the roof structure was independently stable, not requiring lateral restraint from the floor below. Due to height restrictions on the proposals, an origami roof solution was developed to maximise the volume of the new top storey. This was to be exposed internally, with integrated roof lights to maximise daylight into the floor plate. A timber shell structure was created to sit on top of the existing building.

The new building was designed to be an ultra-modern, high-spec office space. New services were required and the façade was designed to have integrated risers to limit impact on floor area. The front façade was replaced with a contemporary masonry façade with a steel frame behind to reinstate stability and vertical load transfer. A new atrium was created through the existing floor plates which required a feature stair that also supported the upper floors to allow removal of existing columns.

Workplace
Architect
Studio Seilern
Client
BB House UK Ltd
Location
London, UK
Ben Adams Architects
GVA Second London Wall
London, UK

At 24 King William Street, we transformed an under-utilised 1980s steel-framed office building into a modern mixed-use space that responds to the urban and historical context.

The refurbishment included a new three-storey mansard as well as a brand-new façade and interior, opening up the ground-level retail space. The new upper storeys include two additional office floors and an open plant deck, adding substantial square footage to the site.

Rather than entire structural systems, we targeted surveys and focused strengthening works on key components. This allowed us to demonstrate that the additional floors could be accommodated onto the existing structure without costly strengthening works to the existing frames or foundation. This also allowed us to maintain occupied rental units on the lower floors.

This approach minimised embodied carbon and limited the additional steelwork strengthening, which in some areas consisted of simple bolt upgrades. While respecting the heritage of the immediate context and protected views along the historic London Bridge area, the project has reinvented 24 King William Street for 21st-century tenants.

Images: Nicholas Worley

Workplace
Architect
Ben Adams Architects
Client
GVA Second London Wall
Location
London, UK

At 24 King William Street, we transformed an under-utilised 1980s steel-framed office building into a modern mixed-use space that responds to the urban and historical context.

The refurbishment included a new three-storey mansard as well as a brand-new façade and interior, opening up the ground-level retail space. The new upper storeys include two additional office floors and an open plant deck, adding substantial square footage to the site.

Rather than entire structural systems, we targeted surveys and focused strengthening works on key components. This allowed us to demonstrate that the additional floors could be accommodated onto the existing structure without costly strengthening works to the existing frames or foundation. This also allowed us to maintain occupied rental units on the lower floors.

This approach minimised embodied carbon and limited the additional steelwork strengthening, which in some areas consisted of simple bolt upgrades. While respecting the heritage of the immediate context and protected views along the historic London Bridge area, the project has reinvented 24 King William Street for 21st-century tenants.

Images: Nicholas Worley

Workplace
Architect
Ben Adams Architects
Client
GVA Second London Wall
Location
London, UK
EPR
Integrity International Group
London, UK

We are working with EPR to refurbish the 1920s office building and associated curtilage buildings, from an office to a 5-star hotel.

55 Broadway is a Grade I listed building, located above St James Underground Station, Westminster. The building was originally designed by Charles Holden and constructed as the new headquarters for the Underground Electric Railways Company of London (UERL), the main forerunner of the London Underground. Upon completion, it was London’s first skyscraper and the tallest office block in the city.

This project is an example of where we can provide our clients with key early advice about the flexibility of buildings and give them the commercial advantage and the confidence to purchase buildings on the competitive open market.

This project received planning permission from a unanimous committee in June 2020.

Workplace
Architect
EPR
Client
Integrity International Group
Location
London, UK

We are working with EPR to refurbish the 1920s office building and associated curtilage buildings, from an office to a 5-star hotel.

55 Broadway is a Grade I listed building, located above St James Underground Station, Westminster. The building was originally designed by Charles Holden and constructed as the new headquarters for the Underground Electric Railways Company of London (UERL), the main forerunner of the London Underground. Upon completion, it was London’s first skyscraper and the tallest office block in the city.

This project is an example of where we can provide our clients with key early advice about the flexibility of buildings and give them the commercial advantage and the confidence to purchase buildings on the competitive open market.

This project received planning permission from a unanimous committee in June 2020.

Workplace
Architect
EPR
Client
Integrity International Group
Location
London, UK
BMJ Architects
Clearbell
London, UK

Our early involvement was required to convert 85 Gray’s Inn Road from a 1990s office building to a modern life sciences hub in the central London district of Bloomsbury. Our experience of retrofitting existing structures for enhanced uses combined with our holistic approach to dynamic analysis of the existing construction helped our client limit costs.

In the early stages, we were able to illustrate where the existing structure was suitable for sensitive equipment and where it could be easily adapted for more significant M&E services. With our input, the test layout floor schemes were driven by limiting structural enhancement and working with the existing building form leading to an agreed and understood middle ground on adaptability of the space, and project cost.

Life Sciences
Architect
BMJ Architects
Client
Clearbell
Location
London, UK

Our early involvement was required to convert 85 Gray’s Inn Road from a 1990s office building to a modern life sciences hub in the central London district of Bloomsbury. Our experience of retrofitting existing structures for enhanced uses combined with our holistic approach to dynamic analysis of the existing construction helped our client limit costs.

In the early stages, we were able to illustrate where the existing structure was suitable for sensitive equipment and where it could be easily adapted for more significant M&E services. With our input, the test layout floor schemes were driven by limiting structural enhancement and working with the existing building form leading to an agreed and understood middle ground on adaptability of the space, and project cost.

Life Sciences
Architect
BMJ Architects
Client
Clearbell
Location
London, UK
Morrow & Lorraine Architects
GVA Second London Wall
London, UK

This project involved the comprehensive refurbishment and extension of a 1980s office building. Located on the southern side of Cannon Street, close to the Circle, District, and Northern lines, the building is clad in stone and glass with a steel frame.

We collaborated with Morrow & Lorraine Architects and GVA Second London Wall to redesign the space and add more storeys. The main challenges included justifying the extra loads on the foundations and strengthening the existing steel portal frames to withstand the increased wind load on the building.

We resolved the many technical challenges this scheme presented through rigorous analysis of the existing structure. Minimising the structural interventions required to accommodate additional floors and alterations to the elevations.

Workplace
Architect
Morrow & Lorraine Architects
Client
GVA Second London Wall
Location
London, UK

This project involved the comprehensive refurbishment and extension of a 1980s office building. Located on the southern side of Cannon Street, close to the Circle, District, and Northern lines, the building is clad in stone and glass with a steel frame.

We collaborated with Morrow & Lorraine Architects and GVA Second London Wall to redesign the space and add more storeys. The main challenges included justifying the extra loads on the foundations and strengthening the existing steel portal frames to withstand the increased wind load on the building.

We resolved the many technical challenges this scheme presented through rigorous analysis of the existing structure. Minimising the structural interventions required to accommodate additional floors and alterations to the elevations.

Workplace
Architect
Morrow & Lorraine Architects
Client
GVA Second London Wall
Location
London, UK
MAKE Architects
Great Portland Estates
London, UK

The proposed development at 180 Piccadilly and 48-50 Jermyn Street involves the demolition of two existing buildings on site. The scheme achieved planning in early 2021 based on a steel frame structure with composite slabs. We are redesigning the steel frame using around 500 tonnes of existing steelwork that has been salvaged from a demolition site in the City of London.

We helped facilitate the reclamation of approximately 1,700 tonnes of the 1990s steelwork for GPE to reuse it in their development projects. This industry-leading work is proving the process of reusing steelwork at scale, and to our knowledge is the largest steel reuse project in the UK.

We are also appointed as BREEAM AP and WELL AP to ensure the project achieves the client’s sustainability targets. A key consideration has been ensuring the specific requirements of BREEAM and WELL are aligned with the client’s ESG targets and the requirements of NABERS Design for Performance. In particular, the WELL requirements for air filtration and thermal comfort have had to be carefully considered against the scheme’s predicted energy consumption, to avoid compromising the NABERS rating.

Workplace
Architect
MAKE Architects
Client
Great Portland Estates
Location
London, UK

The proposed development at 180 Piccadilly and 48-50 Jermyn Street involves the demolition of two existing buildings on site. The scheme achieved planning in early 2021 based on a steel frame structure with composite slabs. We are redesigning the steel frame using around 500 tonnes of existing steelwork that has been salvaged from a demolition site in the City of London.

We helped facilitate the reclamation of approximately 1,700 tonnes of the 1990s steelwork for GPE to reuse it in their development projects. This industry-leading work is proving the process of reusing steelwork at scale, and to our knowledge is the largest steel reuse project in the UK.

We are also appointed as BREEAM AP and WELL AP to ensure the project achieves the client’s sustainability targets. A key consideration has been ensuring the specific requirements of BREEAM and WELL are aligned with the client’s ESG targets and the requirements of NABERS Design for Performance. In particular, the WELL requirements for air filtration and thermal comfort have had to be carefully considered against the scheme’s predicted energy consumption, to avoid compromising the NABERS rating.

Workplace
Architect
MAKE Architects
Client
Great Portland Estates
Location
London, UK
Sheppard Robson
Arcadia
London, UK

As part of the Arcadia Group’s refurbishment of their London Oxford Street offices, we are advising on the alterations to the original 1920s structural steel frame.

Challenges include the fact that the building underwent a major refurbishment in 1985, where much of the spare capacity in the original structure was exploited at this time. Additionally, the Plaza Shopping Centre occupies the first two storeys and basement, which prevents any potential strengthening works to the lower levels. 

We applied our understanding of the building’s history — obtained by inspecting the building and analysing archival records — to justify the introduction of over 420 m2 of additional floor space. The majority of this additional space is provided by projecting the floors into the two existing four-storey deep internal courtyards. These have been covered by a new glazed grid shell roof.

Our 3D Revit model of the structure forms the basis of the team’s Building Information Model (BIM) and is used to coordinate with the other disciplines in the design team.

Workplace
Architect
Sheppard Robson
Client
Arcadia
Location
London, UK

As part of the Arcadia Group’s refurbishment of their London Oxford Street offices, we are advising on the alterations to the original 1920s structural steel frame.

Challenges include the fact that the building underwent a major refurbishment in 1985, where much of the spare capacity in the original structure was exploited at this time. Additionally, the Plaza Shopping Centre occupies the first two storeys and basement, which prevents any potential strengthening works to the lower levels. 

We applied our understanding of the building’s history — obtained by inspecting the building and analysing archival records — to justify the introduction of over 420 m2 of additional floor space. The majority of this additional space is provided by projecting the floors into the two existing four-storey deep internal courtyards. These have been covered by a new glazed grid shell roof.

Our 3D Revit model of the structure forms the basis of the team’s Building Information Model (BIM) and is used to coordinate with the other disciplines in the design team.

Workplace
Architect
Sheppard Robson
Client
Arcadia
Location
London, UK
Emrys Architects
The Berners Allsopp Estate
London, UK

The Schroder & Berners-Allsopp Estate development in Fitzrovia has created 75,000 sq ft of office and retail space, featuring an exposed concrete frame.⠀

Bridging across two urban blocks, the development includes significant improvements to the public realm. Creating a vibrant curved public realm on Wells Mews.⠀

Berners & Wells, a mixed-use development in the heart of Fitzrovia. Designed by Emrys Architects for clients Schroders and Berners Allsopp Estate, the RC frame building offers 80,000 sq ft of office and retail space.

Our engineers reduced the temporary works against the party walls and designed a raft foundation to accommodate the Royal Mail tunnel that runs beneath the site. The building spans over the road to the curved Wells Mews, creating a vibrant and inviting public realm.

Workplace
Architect
Emrys Architects
Client
The Berners Allsopp Estate
Location
London, UK

The Schroder & Berners-Allsopp Estate development in Fitzrovia has created 75,000 sq ft of office and retail space, featuring an exposed concrete frame.⠀

Bridging across two urban blocks, the development includes significant improvements to the public realm. Creating a vibrant curved public realm on Wells Mews.⠀

Berners & Wells, a mixed-use development in the heart of Fitzrovia. Designed by Emrys Architects for clients Schroders and Berners Allsopp Estate, the RC frame building offers 80,000 sq ft of office and retail space.

Our engineers reduced the temporary works against the party walls and designed a raft foundation to accommodate the Royal Mail tunnel that runs beneath the site. The building spans over the road to the curved Wells Mews, creating a vibrant and inviting public realm.

Workplace
Architect
Emrys Architects
Client
The Berners Allsopp Estate
Location
London, UK
MCM Architecture
CMS Cameron McKenna
London, UK

Cannon Place is a distinctive air-rights building located directly above London’s Cannon Street mainline and underground stations. Eight storeys high, the building has large floor plates of almost 50,000 square feet. The building is also virtually column-free with long-span, 21.5m long floor beams and a distinctive external structural skeleton.

CMS Cameron Mckenna acquired three levels of floor for their new London HQ. The works involved a full CAT B fit out including two large feature staircases linking the three-floor plates. The ‘scissor’ staircases were made more challenging due to the complex structure they took support from. A detailed REVIT model was developed to facilitate the process and allow full services integration to be explored before commencing on-site.

Construction access was particularly challenging because there was no provision for large items to be delivered to the building. We developed a gantry-type solution with Network Rail, the building owners and City of London. Site works were complex due to the poor access from the railway station and occupied floors immediately below.

Workplace
Architect
MCM Architecture
Client
CMS Cameron McKenna
Location
London, UK

Cannon Place is a distinctive air-rights building located directly above London’s Cannon Street mainline and underground stations. Eight storeys high, the building has large floor plates of almost 50,000 square feet. The building is also virtually column-free with long-span, 21.5m long floor beams and a distinctive external structural skeleton.

CMS Cameron Mckenna acquired three levels of floor for their new London HQ. The works involved a full CAT B fit out including two large feature staircases linking the three-floor plates. The ‘scissor’ staircases were made more challenging due to the complex structure they took support from. A detailed REVIT model was developed to facilitate the process and allow full services integration to be explored before commencing on-site.

Construction access was particularly challenging because there was no provision for large items to be delivered to the building. We developed a gantry-type solution with Network Rail, the building owners and City of London. Site works were complex due to the poor access from the railway station and occupied floors immediately below.

Workplace
Architect
MCM Architecture
Client
CMS Cameron McKenna
Location
London, UK
Piercy & Company
Derwent London
London, UK

This project is a new build commercial and retail development that replaces three tired 1940s and 1960s buildings that were unsuitable for refurbishment due to compromised headroom and numerous internal columns. The new development provides approximately 85,000 sqft of commercial office and 20,000 sqft of retail space.

A concrete frame was selected as part of a holistic solution which integrated the needs of the design team whilst maximising construction efficiency. The visual qualities of exposed, fair-faced concrete were embraced by the architect and this is evident in the exposed concrete columns and a bespoke coffered slab in the reception area. Post-tensioned slabs have been adopted on a 9 by 9m grid at a thickness of 250mm with thickened slabs at the upper levels to accommodate transfers.

A central reinforced concrete core provides circulation and all lateral stability. The need for piling was removed by carrying out a detailed assessment of the ground conditions, together with considerable ground modelling to allow a raft to be adopted. This has led to a reduced programme for the foundation works and significant savings against the piled option.

Workplace
Architect
Piercy & Company
Client
Derwent London
Location
London, UK

This project is a new build commercial and retail development that replaces three tired 1940s and 1960s buildings that were unsuitable for refurbishment due to compromised headroom and numerous internal columns. The new development provides approximately 85,000 sqft of commercial office and 20,000 sqft of retail space.

A concrete frame was selected as part of a holistic solution which integrated the needs of the design team whilst maximising construction efficiency. The visual qualities of exposed, fair-faced concrete were embraced by the architect and this is evident in the exposed concrete columns and a bespoke coffered slab in the reception area. Post-tensioned slabs have been adopted on a 9 by 9m grid at a thickness of 250mm with thickened slabs at the upper levels to accommodate transfers.

A central reinforced concrete core provides circulation and all lateral stability. The need for piling was removed by carrying out a detailed assessment of the ground conditions, together with considerable ground modelling to allow a raft to be adopted. This has led to a reduced programme for the foundation works and significant savings against the piled option.

Workplace
Architect
Piercy & Company
Client
Derwent London
Location
London, UK
Hawkins\Brown
Mayfair Capital Investment Management
Woking, UK

When Hawkins\Brown Architects proposed to radically redevelop this unloved concrete frame in Woking into one of the town’s most forward-thinking office buildings, we were on board.

Our design inserts an adaptable timber and steel grid into the existing atrium, inviting co-workers to meet and collaborate. It also encourages using the stairs to reach the upper floors rather than waiting for the lift.

We have maximised the client’s asset by converting the fourth-floor plant spaces to new office areas. The ground floor slab was lowered, improving access and visibility by turning the entrance to face the rest of the town off Yorkshire Way.

A lightweight steel and CLT frame was used. This allows fitting an adaptable grid which has flexibility for future dismantling and redevelopment whilst also taking care not to add significant pressure to the existing foundations. A key constraint of the project has been investigating the existing building and identifying the risks associated with adding loads to the existing structure.

Workplace
Architect
Hawkins\Brown
Client
Mayfair Capital Investment Management
Location
Woking, UK

When Hawkins\Brown Architects proposed to radically redevelop this unloved concrete frame in Woking into one of the town’s most forward-thinking office buildings, we were on board.

Our design inserts an adaptable timber and steel grid into the existing atrium, inviting co-workers to meet and collaborate. It also encourages using the stairs to reach the upper floors rather than waiting for the lift.

We have maximised the client’s asset by converting the fourth-floor plant spaces to new office areas. The ground floor slab was lowered, improving access and visibility by turning the entrance to face the rest of the town off Yorkshire Way.

A lightweight steel and CLT frame was used. This allows fitting an adaptable grid which has flexibility for future dismantling and redevelopment whilst also taking care not to add significant pressure to the existing foundations. A key constraint of the project has been investigating the existing building and identifying the risks associated with adding loads to the existing structure.

Workplace
Architect
Hawkins\Brown
Client
Mayfair Capital Investment Management
Location
Woking, UK
Stanton Williams
The Mercers' Company
London, UK

The redevelopment revitalised the core estate of the Mercers’ livery company. Located near Bank in the historic City of London, the site presented challenging development constraints including access via a narrow medieval alley, numerous neighbouring buildings, and potential medieval and Roman archaeology.

The two buildings that occupied the site were demolished to make way for high-grade commercial office space. The new building features distinctive façades which aim to work sympathetically with the surrounding buildings.

We worked closely with Stanton Williams to progress the detailed design of the new structure. The scheme will lower of the existing basement to form a new raft foundation slab. Targeted site investigations have plotted existing foundation levels along the boundary and informed a scheme which minuses the need for underpinning. On the ground floor, the building is bisected by a new public thoroughfare which will improve pedestrian permeability. Large column spacing has been achieved using steel framing and concrete slabs to provide five stories of flexible, Grade A office space above ground.

Workplace
Architect
Stanton Williams
Client
The Mercers' Company
Location
London, UK

The redevelopment revitalised the core estate of the Mercers’ livery company. Located near Bank in the historic City of London, the site presented challenging development constraints including access via a narrow medieval alley, numerous neighbouring buildings, and potential medieval and Roman archaeology.

The two buildings that occupied the site were demolished to make way for high-grade commercial office space. The new building features distinctive façades which aim to work sympathetically with the surrounding buildings.

We worked closely with Stanton Williams to progress the detailed design of the new structure. The scheme will lower of the existing basement to form a new raft foundation slab. Targeted site investigations have plotted existing foundation levels along the boundary and informed a scheme which minuses the need for underpinning. On the ground floor, the building is bisected by a new public thoroughfare which will improve pedestrian permeability. Large column spacing has been achieved using steel framing and concrete slabs to provide five stories of flexible, Grade A office space above ground.

Workplace
Architect
Stanton Williams
Client
The Mercers' Company
Location
London, UK
Emrys Architects
GMS Estates
London, UK

Our client, a private property owner, wanted to create a showpiece office space to attract new business opportunities. The proposal was to replace the original mishmash of single-storey extensions to the rear of their 5-storey Grade II listed Georgian Terrace property into a high-quality, open-plan working space with a sculptural roof form.

The work included excavating the lower ground floor to create additional headroom whilst retaining a listed masonry vault. The landlocked site is surrounded by similar buildings, with land access only possible through buildings. Delivery of large elements would require the use of large cranes and road closures. This heavily influenced the choice of structural solution.
The form of the roof required us to produce physical models to understand its structural behaviour. From these preliminary models, it became clear that the panels, which formed both ridges and valleys, would be structurally stable provided the perimeter nodes were horizontally restrained. This would mean the nodes could not move vertically.

The result was a system of panels that transferred load in bending but were effectively propped off each other. The structural solution was timber stress skin roof panels fabricated on-site with no structural steelwork. This allowed us to avoid craneage.

Workplace
Architect
Emrys Architects
Client
GMS Estates
Location
London, UK

Our client, a private property owner, wanted to create a showpiece office space to attract new business opportunities. The proposal was to replace the original mishmash of single-storey extensions to the rear of their 5-storey Grade II listed Georgian Terrace property into a high-quality, open-plan working space with a sculptural roof form.

The work included excavating the lower ground floor to create additional headroom whilst retaining a listed masonry vault. The landlocked site is surrounded by similar buildings, with land access only possible through buildings. Delivery of large elements would require the use of large cranes and road closures. This heavily influenced the choice of structural solution.
The form of the roof required us to produce physical models to understand its structural behaviour. From these preliminary models, it became clear that the panels, which formed both ridges and valleys, would be structurally stable provided the perimeter nodes were horizontally restrained. This would mean the nodes could not move vertically.

The result was a system of panels that transferred load in bending but were effectively propped off each other. The structural solution was timber stress skin roof panels fabricated on-site with no structural steelwork. This allowed us to avoid craneage.

Workplace
Architect
Emrys Architects
Client
GMS Estates
Location
London, UK
Londonon
Hav Eiendom
Oslo, Norway

Grønlikaia is a major, new waterfront transformation project in the heart of Oslo, Norway. As one of the last waterfront sites in the city, it is an opportunity to create an inclusive and diverse “fjord city”, aimed at a wide variety of Oslo’s population, including the underserved communities of the eastern parts of the city.

Londonon gathered a team of experts in sustainability, placemaking, new forms of living, circular and doughnut economy, landscape design, and waterfront development. The exemplary project is making the water more accessible and creating new public spaces, cultural institutions, active streetscapes, and exceptional architecture.

The proposal will accommodate all the inhabitants of the site, both above and below the water. It uses upcycled marine steel to create a low-carbon quay-front and new habitats for fish, which will help to maintain existing marine and land-based natural resources as a central tenet of the development. All new buildings are designed to create better ecological conditions, contributing to the much-needed restoration of marine life in the Oslo fjord.

Community & Public
Architect
Londonon
Client
Hav Eiendom
Location
Oslo, Norway

Grønlikaia is a major, new waterfront transformation project in the heart of Oslo, Norway. As one of the last waterfront sites in the city, it is an opportunity to create an inclusive and diverse “fjord city”, aimed at a wide variety of Oslo’s population, including the underserved communities of the eastern parts of the city.

Londonon gathered a team of experts in sustainability, placemaking, new forms of living, circular and doughnut economy, landscape design, and waterfront development. The exemplary project is making the water more accessible and creating new public spaces, cultural institutions, active streetscapes, and exceptional architecture.

The proposal will accommodate all the inhabitants of the site, both above and below the water. It uses upcycled marine steel to create a low-carbon quay-front and new habitats for fish, which will help to maintain existing marine and land-based natural resources as a central tenet of the development. All new buildings are designed to create better ecological conditions, contributing to the much-needed restoration of marine life in the Oslo fjord.

Community & Public
Architect
Londonon
Client
Hav Eiendom
Location
Oslo, Norway
dMFK Architects
The Salters' Company
London, UK

The RIBA Award-winning restoration and extension of the brutalist Grade II listed landmark, the last to be designed by Sir Basil Spence.

Originally built in 1976, the Worshipful Company of Salters sought to maximise the lettable floor space within the existing structure, better the sustainability rating and increase the public visibility of the building.

Alterations include modernisation of the existing building services, refurbishment of the ceremonial hall, extensions to floor plates and introduction of a contemporary double-height entrance.

Workplace
Architect
dMFK Architects
Client
The Salters' Company
Location
London, UK

The RIBA Award-winning restoration and extension of the brutalist Grade II listed landmark, the last to be designed by Sir Basil Spence.

Originally built in 1976, the Worshipful Company of Salters sought to maximise the lettable floor space within the existing structure, better the sustainability rating and increase the public visibility of the building.

Alterations include modernisation of the existing building services, refurbishment of the ceremonial hall, extensions to floor plates and introduction of a contemporary double-height entrance.

Workplace
Architect
dMFK Architects
Client
The Salters' Company
Location
London, UK
Squire & Partners
The Department Store
London, UK

The Department Store Studios is a four-storey contemporary workspace building in Brixton, London. Providing 13,000 sq ft of workspace and 4,500 sq ft of retail, the development creates a platform for growing businesses with flexible workspaces – from individual desks to private studios – and a host of serviced social and meeting areas. The Studios is also home to a neighbourhood bar, restaurant, and screening room.

The crafted red brick building takes inspiration from the robust Edwardian aesthetic of its sister development, The Department Store, with patterned brickwork and contemporary faceted bay windows. A setback fourth floor responds to the surrounding residential streets and creates generous planted external terraces. Internally, designs are centred on sustainability and the honesty of raw materials, with an exposed timber superstructure consisting of CLT floors supported on glulam beams and columns.

Workplace
Architect
Squire & Partners
Client
The Department Store
Location
London, UK

The Department Store Studios is a four-storey contemporary workspace building in Brixton, London. Providing 13,000 sq ft of workspace and 4,500 sq ft of retail, the development creates a platform for growing businesses with flexible workspaces – from individual desks to private studios – and a host of serviced social and meeting areas. The Studios is also home to a neighbourhood bar, restaurant, and screening room.

The crafted red brick building takes inspiration from the robust Edwardian aesthetic of its sister development, The Department Store, with patterned brickwork and contemporary faceted bay windows. A setback fourth floor responds to the surrounding residential streets and creates generous planted external terraces. Internally, designs are centred on sustainability and the honesty of raw materials, with an exposed timber superstructure consisting of CLT floors supported on glulam beams and columns.

Workplace
Architect
Squire & Partners
Client
The Department Store
Location
London, UK
Grafton Architects, Piercy&Co (Interiors)
Duke Street Properties Ltd. (formerly Selfridges Group) and FORA
London, UK

The Parcels Building — known as such because it sits atop a former ‘Mail Rail’ station — occupies the corner of Oxford and Duke Streets in London’s West End, across from the world-famous Selfridges department store. As part of an effort to lift the character of the area, the Parcels Building refurbishment includes installing a new façade to the 1950s building and adding a storey to the part-retail, part-office scheme.

The emphasis on external appearance meant that the façade was a focal point of the development. Grafton Architects designed a grid of Portland stone, with 1.4m-wide Pierre Bleue piers that rise from ground to roof level, recessed lintels, and bands of deep horizontal shading elements at each level. On Oxford Street, the piers protrude in a softly angled form, while on Duke Street they lie flush with the elevation.

As refined and elegant as it is, the heavy new stone façade required structural innovation to support its projection from the existing frame. To achieve this, we developed a bespoke bracketry system which applied load to the columns and beams in a way that was sympathetic to the existing structural frame, reducing the need for strengthening works. Retaining the structure saved 513T CO2e.

Retail
Architect
Grafton Architects, Piercy&Co (Interiors)
Client
Duke Street Properties Ltd. (formerly Selfridges Group) and FORA
Location
London, UK

The Parcels Building — known as such because it sits atop a former ‘Mail Rail’ station — occupies the corner of Oxford and Duke Streets in London’s West End, across from the world-famous Selfridges department store. As part of an effort to lift the character of the area, the Parcels Building refurbishment includes installing a new façade to the 1950s building and adding a storey to the part-retail, part-office scheme.

The emphasis on external appearance meant that the façade was a focal point of the development. Grafton Architects designed a grid of Portland stone, with 1.4m-wide Pierre Bleue piers that rise from ground to roof level, recessed lintels, and bands of deep horizontal shading elements at each level. On Oxford Street, the piers protrude in a softly angled form, while on Duke Street they lie flush with the elevation.

As refined and elegant as it is, the heavy new stone façade required structural innovation to support its projection from the existing frame. To achieve this, we developed a bespoke bracketry system which applied load to the columns and beams in a way that was sympathetic to the existing structural frame, reducing the need for strengthening works. Retaining the structure saved 513T CO2e.

Retail
Architect
Grafton Architects, Piercy&Co (Interiors)
Client
Duke Street Properties Ltd. (formerly Selfridges Group) and FORA
Location
London, UK
IF_DO
Southwark Council
London, UK

The Hithe is an example of how timber can be used to create temporary, sustainable, and affordable buildings on unused plots of land. A low-cost, meanwhile incubator space in Rotherhithe, it has been designed as a circular economy demonstrator project, and will be demounted and relocated after 10 years.

Designed with IF_DO for the London Borough of Southwark and Meanwhile Space CIC. The relatively small site has been provided by the council on a meanwhile basis for 11 years. Working within a tight budget, the Hithe has been designed to be fully demountable and relocatable, ensuring long-term use. It is one of three circular economy demonstrator projects in London for CIRCuIT (Circular Construction in Regenerative Cities).

Community & Public
Architect
IF_DO
Client
Southwark Council
Location
London, UK

The Hithe is an example of how timber can be used to create temporary, sustainable, and affordable buildings on unused plots of land. A low-cost, meanwhile incubator space in Rotherhithe, it has been designed as a circular economy demonstrator project, and will be demounted and relocated after 10 years.

Designed with IF_DO for the London Borough of Southwark and Meanwhile Space CIC. The relatively small site has been provided by the council on a meanwhile basis for 11 years. Working within a tight budget, the Hithe has been designed to be fully demountable and relocatable, ensuring long-term use. It is one of three circular economy demonstrator projects in London for CIRCuIT (Circular Construction in Regenerative Cities).

Community & Public
Architect
IF_DO
Client
Southwark Council
Location
London, UK
Fletcher Priest Architects
Derwent London
London, UK

A sensitive refurbishment of the former RBS office in east London into modern workspace for Derwent. 

A new steel framed atrium comprised of cantilever moment frames at first floor level replaces the existing low quality lean-to side extension from the 8 storey RC framed building. Works included the refurbishment of the existing basement below the new atrium, forming a new staircase from the street down to basement level to create an open and appealing entrance into an exhibition space. 

During the design phase, we were involved in a detailed discussions and approvals process with London Underground due to the proximity of underground tunnels which run adjacent to the scheme under Whitechapel High Street.

Workplace
Architect
Fletcher Priest Architects
Client
Derwent London
Location
London, UK

A sensitive refurbishment of the former RBS office in east London into modern workspace for Derwent. 

A new steel framed atrium comprised of cantilever moment frames at first floor level replaces the existing low quality lean-to side extension from the 8 storey RC framed building. Works included the refurbishment of the existing basement below the new atrium, forming a new staircase from the street down to basement level to create an open and appealing entrance into an exhibition space. 

During the design phase, we were involved in a detailed discussions and approvals process with London Underground due to the proximity of underground tunnels which run adjacent to the scheme under Whitechapel High Street.

Workplace
Architect
Fletcher Priest Architects
Client
Derwent London
Location
London, UK